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ESTATE AND GIFT PLANNING

A Legacy of Giving: Michael Pollon Society
Leave a legacy of support to an organization you love.

By remembering the Music Conservatory of Westchester in your will or beneficiary arrangements, you create a legacy of transforming lives, expressing gratitude and making a difference in the world through music education.

Whether you wish to provide general operating income for the Conservatory to use wherever it is most needed (which provides the most flexibility) or to support a specific department or program, your bequest expresses your lasting commitment to the Conservatory. A bequest to the Conservatory may also help you meet your financial and estate-planning goals since an estate-tax charitable deduction for the entire amount of the gift is allowed.

Potential Benefits of Estate Giving

  • Eliminate long-term capital gains tax
  • Receive a current income tax deduction
  • Reduce possible estate and gift taxes
  • Increase income and effective rate of return

Michael Pollon (1913-1996)
In 1938, Michael Pollon, a former Executive Director of the Music Conservatory of Westchester, first joined the Conservatory community as a piano and music theory teacher. He taught piano and music theory for 26 years before becoming director in 1964. At that point, there were 47 students; when he retired in 1985, enrollment stood at 745. He helped found the Westchester Arts Council in 1965 and founded the Music Educators League of Westchester in the 1970s. His legacy of excellence, leadership and musicianship continues over 70 years later at the Music Conservatory of Westchester.  Mr. Pollon was born in Vienna, studied piano and musicology in Berlin and was a graduate of the Music Academy in Prague, where he studied composition and conducting under George Szell.

We are happy to discuss giving opportunities with you. For more information, please contact Liz Garger at (914) 761-3900 ext. 106 or aishling@musiced.org.

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